Fishing Reports

Fishing Report - August 19
 The water is as warm as your uncle's old hot tub and we're having flashbacks to last summer. We wanted to wait until we had a clear picture of the situation to put out the word regarding the new fishing restrictions brought forth by Alberta Environment. By now many anglers will have heard about the Time Of Day Restrictions (TOD), or "Hoot Owl" closures that will come into effect at 2 PM Saturday, August 20th 2022. Many anglers will have not heard, and that is where we come into pick up the slack and help get the word out.
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Fishing Report - August 2
While it’s down from around 200+ cms during most of July, there’s still more water in the river than on average for this time of year. The fishing is stellar. We’re lucky to live by the Bow River, one of the best trout waters in the world. Calgarians are sure enjoying the weather, taking to the water in hordes and on any watercraft that is semi-legal. The Bow in town has morphed into a floating inflatable circus featuring giant flamingos, unicorns, roving SUP gangs, and no shortage of Bluetooth speakers.
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Fishing Report - July 16
 If you really need to, throw on a dropper but don't tell your friends. It's not considered sporting to nymph for cutthroat, the fine and noble trout of the West. This week, stoneflies have been flying sorties across the creeks to deposit eggs on the water in bomber squadron formations. Big Westslope cutties were more than happy to put the clamp down hard on foam imitations. 
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Fishing Report - June 17
 Use extreme caution anywhere near the river, as currents are raging and the turbid latte colored water conceals significant amounts of debris, including root balls, trees, concrete, rebar, and tons of other hazards. It's not recommended to enter the water at all. Many pathway closures are still in effect. Fish still need to feed though, and some big pike will be found in the murky back bays of the Bow.
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Fishing Report - June 2
  June has arrived, and usually this means high water. As you may have noticed, runoff has yet to appear in our neck of the woods. Streams and rivers throughout Southern and Central Alberta are unseasonably low, clear, and spooky. In addition to fish and wildlife, farmers and ranchers in our province are hurting for water to grow crops. However, it may not yet be cause for despair.
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